Our changing world

So, today I needed to write a check for a credit card payment.  I looked, and looked and looked for the proper entity to which to assign the check, found two invitations to pay my bill on line; and a box to fill in with the amount I was paying, but no MAKE CHECK PAYABLE TO…

…finally, I made the check payable to the name of the card, with some misgiving, and then! saw! in no more than three point type — tiny enough, yes, to be a Design Element, in a single line, right at the break where the payment coupon separates from the bill —

make check payable to Card Services

OK, fine.  I added Card Services to the payment line, and then bethought to write a note, which I did, asking that the check payable instructions be made visible.

It was only after I had folded the note with the check and the coupon into the envelope that I realized that the children — by which I mean people who were students at the college when I worked there in 2011, who could have reasonably been expected to graduate by now — did not read, or write, cursive.

So, my note may arrive on the desk of someone who cannot read it, and who may have to call for a manager or a vice president, or. . .someone. . .to translate it for them.

Does this open up a new line of work?  Cursive Reader?

Maybe I can get a job.

In the meantime, back to work I go.

2 thoughts on “Our changing world”

  1. this seems to be a new trend. I have even noticed it on my medical bills. Suspect it is due to an increase in folks who pay their bills via electronic methods. We, as a society, are so gonna’ be screwed as the cyberwars heat up.

  2. Snickering here. As a fountain pen fancier and handwriting/calligraphy aficionado and practitioner, I have often participated in discussions bewailing this, that

    people ….who could have reasonably been expected to graduate by now — did not read, or write, cursive.

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